Harringay online

Harringay, Haringey - So Good they Spelt it Twice!

The Council's head of leisure services has today sent an email in the following terms to all local councillors:

"Dear Councillors and Colleagues,

This is just a short note to bring to your attention that during an inspection of the underground reservoir in Finsbury Park Thames Water have identified that one of the circular arches in the reservoir has changed shape and there is a crack in the roof.

As a precautionary measure, and in accordance with their own H&S guidance, Thames Water will be erecting Heras fencing around the reservoir to prevent public access on to the grass roof of the reservoir.

I have stressed with them today our concerns about the effectiveness of the Heras fencing in a public park setting and they have undertaken to keep this under review.

Thames Water will be arranging for a more detailed inspection to be undertaken, decide what remedial work will be required, secure funding for the work and undertake the work. Therefore, this matter is likely to take several months at least to rectify. Thames Water could not be more specific about the timescales.

I will endeavour to update you further once we hear more from Thames Water."

In addition, I have received a call directly from an official at Thames Water, who has provided me with contact details and has offered to meet with me and other councillors on site if required. She advises me that the Jamaica Village event will not be affected.

I will be happy to forward any specific queries which residents may wish to email to me. My address, once again, is david.schmitz@haringey.gov.uk

David Schmitz

Liberal Democrat Councillor for Harringay Ward

 

Tags for Forum Posts: finsbury park reservoir

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Thanks Nick. I'm not sure who paid. Anyone?

I've got a lot of wild poppy seeds so will give it a go too.
There is also the Reservoir de Montsouris that provides 20 % of Paris' inhabitants with their fresh water.

http://crnchy.com/travel/le-reservoir-de-montsouris/
I was there a few weeks ago and it's amazing though a bit of a palaver to get a ticket (a French friend with a thorough understanding of Parisian bureaucracy did it for me). Actually that Parc de Montsouris is probably the loveliest in Paris but hardly visited by tourists. It's really easy to get to (RER line B to Cite Universitaire or line 4 to Porte d'Orleans and a short walk). That's my Trip Advisor slot over.

Hi there,

the reservoir is near the children's playground, just down the hill towards Seven Sisters Road. It's a dead flat field surrounded by trees and gets boggy in the winter time.It's between the MacKenzie pavillion (old toilets, now an art gallery) and the inner ring road to the park.

Hi There is that the football field you are on about and the hut on the path? where the path splits into two sections?

This bit, on the right.

Hi thanks there is a photo Here of the hole open i suspect when they did the maintenance work to it. It doesn't look like its the same place. V confused am interested in the site have been trying to do some history on it. Also on some old Victorian tunnels, etc and am looking to seek permission from water board for a visit.

That's a brilliant set of pictures. Thanks Matthew. I was particularly interested in this one:

  

And here are the pictures of the entrance:

 

 

And an atmospheric interior:

Hey no worries. :). Is the location as where the other guy said? or is it on the football pitch HERE

I think it's the flat area bordering Seven Sisters Road.

In fact the real idyll that was Hornsey Wood House was long gone by the time Fisher was writing. The original Hornsey Wood House was the old manor house Copt Hall (possibly the structure responsible for the naming of Manor House). It was pulled down and replaced in with an Inn in 1796.

Here's a quote I used in my Wikipedia Harringay history article for this period:

The old Hornsey Wood House well became its situation; it was embowered, and seemed a part of the wood. Two sisters, a Mrs. Lloyd and a Mrs. Collier, kept the house; they were ancient women, large in size, and usually sat before their door on a seat fixed between two venerable oaks, wherein swarms of bees hived themselves. Here the venerable and cheerful dames tasted many a refreshing cup with their good-natured customers, and told tales of bygone days, till, in very old age, one of them passed to her grave, and the other followed in a few months afterwards

Full article with pictures + links to more in the series here.

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