Harringay online

Harringay, Haringey - So Good they Spelt it Twice!

Just seen this on the Bluecoats Twitter feed

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Good! Hopefully some of the glory will spill over to our corner of the borough. 

The assertion that North Tottenham is known to the locals as NoTo is laughable. We who live in Tottenham call it North Tottenham -- anything else is PR nonsense thrown about to attract the hipster gentrification crowd.

Dont fret. Down here we live in HaHa (Harringay Haringey) and over to the west they're in MuHi.

But are those the terms used in British Vogue (or other publications of similar witlessness)?

But do you really care what Vogue say about Tottenham?

I don't much care what Vogue says (it's an expensive niche publication). But the terms "SoTo" and "NoTo" are appearing with increasing frequency in The Evening Standard (for one), and are also being used in the foreign press to sell sites at Tottenham Hale to the buy-to-leave foreign investment market. In contributes, in the longer term, to the inequality in housing (etc.) that already obtains in London.

NoTo or No Go? 

Why No Go?

Sorry, Hugh, but you do call Hermitage Road the Harringay Warehouse District... ;-)

Well that area was an industrial area fringed by a few residential streets. So as a modern slightly transatlantic version, it’s not wholly inaccurate (and do remember there was already a move to name it Manor House Warehouse District before I got there. Some of the longer term residents of the ‘warehouses’ were happy to join me in trying to reassert the Harringay part of the name). 

You mean like it says on Google maps?HWD.png

Yup. Luckily I got to Google Maps before they closed off most neighbourhood editing to users. HWD was relatively straightforward. There were a few boundary edits after I added the area, but nothing unreasonable. For some reason, the real challenge was with Harringay.

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