Harringay online

Harringay, Haringey - So Good they Spelt it Twice!

The PM announced today that the Government is seeking to introduce new regulations to give greater freedom for buildings and land in town centres to change use without planning permission and create new homes from the regeneration of vacant and redundant buildings.

Under the new rules, existing commercial properties, including newly vacant shops, can be converted into residential housing more easily, in a move to kick start the construction industry and speed up rebuilding.

I wonder about the potential impact on Harringay. It looks like the existing barriers which protect our high street shops from being permanently converted into restaurants are set to be lifted, and small business premises off the high street may be lost as freeholders cash in on the opportunity to convert them into flats without having to go through the normal planning controls or consultations.

The details below are from the announcement here

The changes include:

  • More types of commercial premises having total flexibility to be repurposed through reform of the Use Classes Order. A building used for retail, for instance, would be able to be permanently used as a café or office without requiring a planning application and local authority approval. Pubs, libraries, village shops and other types of uses essential to the lifeblood of communities will not be covered by these flexibilities.

  • A wider range of commercial buildings will be allowed to change to residential use without the need for a planning application.

  • Builders will no longer need a normal planning application to demolish and rebuild vacant and redundant residential and commercial buildings if they are rebuilt as homes.

  • Property owners will be able to build additional space above their properties via a fast track approval process, subject to neighbour consultation.

These changes, which are planned to come into effect by September through changes to the law, will both support the high street revival by allowing empty commercial properties to be quickly repurposed and reduce the pressure to build on green field land by making brownfield development easier. Developers will still need to adhere to high standards and regulations, just without the unnecessary red tape.

Tags for Forum Posts: Planning

Views: 454

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

"Property owners will be able to build additional space above their properties" - like adding a 3rd floor to a Ladder terrace house?

So far, the new permitted development rights for upwards extensions relate to additional flats on top of detached purpose built blocks of flats which are between 3 storeys and 30 metres tall, built between 1948 and 2018 (other criteria apply); although clearly the intention is to extend this principle to other types of property.

I don't know if that's what they have in mind, but there are already a few streets in the borough where terraced houses are being extended upwards.

There is guidance for South Tottenham which allows front roof dormers and upward extensions in that area, which otherwise would not gain planning permission.

Can anyone recommend any architect who would be good at doing designs for that type of thing and getting them through planning permission?

Just what would it take to turn the Ladder into a conservation area? 

An outline area description and local pressure would be a good start. This one for Inkerman Road in Kentish Town is a good example of the elements of a conservation area statement 

At the very least I think the views from the bridges over the New River are worth preserving

Yes, looking at the map of Haringey's conservation areas leaves me with that impression, particularly local pressure (the whole southern half of Stroud Green ward? A straggle of buildings on St Ann's Road plus Chestnuts Park?) as well as clear architectural coherence/merit (Noel Park, Tower Gardens, Hillfield Ave in Hornsey, The Campsbourne Estate).

RSS

Advertising

© 2020   Created by Hugh.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service